A material Utopia: The Metropolitan Museum of Art collections

Aquamanile- Lion, c. 1400, Nuremburg

 The Lamentation, 1480, Spain

Detail of “The Hunters Enter the Woods”- Tapestry, c. 1500, Flemish

Velvet Panel, late 15th century, Italian

Standing Cup, late 16th century, Breslau, Germany

Minnekätschen, 1325-1350, German

Julius Caesar, by the workshop of Colin Nouahilher, French, 1541

Ivory casket, 14th century, French

Grisaille panel, 1240, French

Fresco on canvas, 12th century, Castile-Leon, Spain

Gold casket, 16th century, Italian

Once upon a time…

Or, in 2010, I went to New York City with my friend Exa. We took the train in from Westport where I was visiting my aunts, and went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. WHAT. A. COLLECTION. My heart literally could not stop beating super fast the entire time we were there. It was a utopia of visual delight- my eyes were drawn to every corner, ceiling and floor tile- every surface had some form of art on it. I’ve recently begun the AWESOME process of going through the collections they post online, and I spent a good couple of hours drooling over some particular things.

Please revel in the glory of  material objects! That sounds bad, but they’re too lovely to ignore.

All images from http://www.metmuseum.org

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Seattle Art Museum

Any chance to be close to art is a chance I’ll take. I’m an Art History major who loves art to the point that I have cried in front of a  painting. Yup.

The Seattle Art Museum has a rather brilliant collection of art, and they had an ENORMOUS retrospect of Paul Gauguin, the French badass, asshole, and artistic genius. Unfortunately, we were not allowed to take photographs in the Gauguin exhibit, but trust me: it was awesome! However, it was:

-Very crowded

-Full of babies (WHATTTT?)

-Really really dark

The rest of the museum was super quiet as a result, which was fantastic for me! I was able to take lots of pictures from weird angles and not get judged- I tend to take pictures from the floor, or sit on benches and balance the camera on my head because my hands aren’t stable enough.

My favorite part is the old Italian wing, where they have lots of Byzantine paintings with amazing gold gilding, mostly on wood. The Baroque room is ostentatious and ridiculous, but nonetheless entertaining. The museum has a really great collection of objects and is laid out in a really great way so that you don’t feel crowded by other people or feel like you’ve seen the art before- I always go back and find something new every time I visit.